Right and Wrong Uses of Social Media in the Workplace

To tweet or not to tweet, that is the question plaguing businesses everywhere these days. And it’s not just tweeting that causes the continuous cycle between dread and euphoria in the minds of business leaders, but employee postings to all of social media.

But what about social media in the workplace? Surely business leaders are ok with banter held inside company walls. That is, after all, pretty much the digital version of the traditional hangouts around the water cooler.

And as it turns out, yes, from department managers to the CEO, internal social media generally gets a thumbs-up with a relieved sigh. Employees however are not so pleased.

Three CareerBuilder’s surveys shed light on what employers get right — and what they get wrong – on internal social media sites.

The first survey was done on MiracleWorkers, CareerBuilder’s niche site for healthcare workers. Respondents cheered employers who post job listings (40%), fact sheets and Q&As about the company (26%), information on career paths (26%), employee testimonials (22%) and fun stuff about working for the company (19%).

However, respondents said employers get bad marks for writing posts that look and sound like an ad (35%), failing to answer posted questions in a timely manner or at all (33%), failing to regularly post on the social media site or in company blogs (23%), and for censoring social media comments (20%).

The second survey was conducted on WorkinRetail, CareerBuilder’s niche site for retail workers. There respondents lined-up pretty much with what healthcare respondents said but they added a few things to their list of likes as well.

Respondents cheered employers who post job listings (33%), fact sheets and Q&As about the company (27%), information on career paths (27%), employee testimonials (18%) and fun stuff about working for the company (18%). But they also liked it when retail employers posted pictures of company events (13%), videos of a day on the job (13%) and videos of new products and services (13%).

This group of workers also frowned on employers who write posts that look and sound like an ad (43%), fail to answer posted questions in a timely manner or at all (38%), fail to regularly post on the social media site or in company blogs (24%), and who censor social media comments (27%).

The third survey was conducted on Sologig, CareerBuilder’s niche site for IT and engineering workers. This group was not as fond of employee testimonials as the other two worker groups were, nor were they keen about posts of pictures of company events or videos about a day on the job.

Respondents cheered employers who post job listings (39%), fact sheets and Q&As about the company (32%), information on career paths (24%), employee testimonials (22%), fun stuff about working for the company (21%), video of new products and services (17%), and employee testimonials (16%).

This group of workers also frowned on employers who write posts that look and sound like an ad (53%), fail to answer posted questions in a timely manner or at all (32%), fail to regularly post on the social media site or in company blogs (25%), and who censor social media comments (27%). But they also hated inconsistency in company messages between social media venues (26%).

Interestingly, CareerBuilder found that posting job listings on a company’s internal social media site is a highly efficient (and cheap) means to recruit new workers. 41% of IT workers and 30% of healthcare workers pass these job opportunities to friends and to their professional networks.

So now you know what your employees would like to hear from you on your company social media – and what they don’t want to hear. Go forth and mingle with confidence!

 

 

 

Pam Baker

Pam Baker

Contributor at Tech Page One
Pam Baker is the author of eight books and hundreds of technology articles published daily in leading online and print publications. She is a member of the National Press Club (NPC) and the Internet Press Guild (IPG).
Pam Baker
Pam Baker
Tags: Business Management,Productivity,Technology